New Year, New Skill!  Over at The Monthly Stitch, we are learning new skills this month and I decided to confront an old nemesis of mine; welt pockets.

Like buttonholes, I usually go to great lengths to avoid them, but one of the projects I’m working on is an 18th century coat for the Oaf, also known as my husband, and it requires two welt pockets.  I made a couple of practice ones first. These are single welt pockets.

Practice Pockets
Practice Pockets

I used a tutorial from Kathleen Fasanella’s blog (great site for technical stuff). And by ‘used a tutorial’ I mean ‘looked at the pictures and winged it–sorta.’ The top one is velvet which is what I am using for the coat. It’s somewhat slippery but wasn’t as hard to work with as I thought it would be.

The bottom one is a piece of printed corduroy from a skirt I picked up because I liked the cloth.

Welt04This is the finished pocket in the coat. Luckily, it has pocket flaps to cover it. I was frustrated with this one because  it gapes, which is the main problem I had with previous welt pockets I’ve attempted.

And, really, none of the tutorials I found online were satisfactory. So on Friday I stopped into the used bookstore that is only a few blocks

singertailoringfrom my house, and fewer from my work and picked up a Book. The Singer Tailoring Book. It’s the old one; apparently it was recently updated with more modern photos or some such.

The instructions for the welt pockets are really clear and now I know to reinforce the pocket opening to keep it from gapeing.

A few pictures from the making of the Singer Tailoring Welt Pocket. It’s not actually difficult to do, but it takes more than one to master, that’s for sure.

Welt05Welt06WElt08Welt09Success!

The only thing that I am worried about is the bulk. It may be a fabric choice issue, because the cloth is a thin wool crepe.

It’s only success, not perfection. If I were going to make welt pockets in an actual garment, I would practice a few more times, but I understand the process now, and for that I will be ever thankful to the gods (and writers) of Singer.

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